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A Different Kind of Literacy: Art Show "Cliteracy" Hits NYC This Weekend

You'll have to forgive the puns. "Cliteracy," for one: a knowledge of women's bodies and female sexuality. "Phallusy," for another: patriarchal misinformation. At Baang + Burne's booth at Scope NYC (one of the many fairs in New York for Armory Week), artist Sophia Wallace rewrites the language of women's bodies, of female pleasure, of (you guessed it) the...

Beyond Betty White: Three Other Amazing Older Women on TV

Today, in honor of International Women's Day, I want to recognize the women who have hung in there for decades on the small screen, playing (mostly) wives and mothers and then grandmothers to the ever-younger main characters. Who's ready to start a Facebook campaign to get one of these women hosting Saturday Night Live

Gay in Russia? Soon, That Could Cost You $16,000.

Elena Kostyuchenko (in the yellow hat) at the pro-gay Day of Kisses protest. 

On January 25, 2013 the Russian State Duma swiftly passed  a bill banning the "promotion of homosexuality." The bill will have to undergo two more readings and be signed by the Russian president before it becomes law. If this happens, it will...

Can Art Stop Murder? In Chiapas, Mexico, Ni Una M√°s is Trying.

To tabloid readers they are bodies and blood. Stories of scandal. The irresistible macabre. But the voices of art and activism group Ni Una Más want us to know that the ninety one women killed recently in the highlands of Chiapas, Mexico are daughters, mothers, sisters, schoolmates, friends. And they have names, though they no longer have their...

On Our Radar: Today's Feminist News Roundup

Happy almost-the-weekend, everybody! Here's what's been blowing up the Interwebs.

• At the Guardian's Comment is Free, Jill Filipovic wrote about straight women who change their names upon marriage, asking, modest-proposal–like, that men be expected to do the same. Twitter freaked out. [The Guardian]

• An anonymous mother wrote about outsourcing the diaper-changing of...

Remember Flicka? The Main Character Used to be Male!

The 2006 film Flicka is one of many interpretations of Mary O'Hara's 1941 novel My Friend Flicka, telling the story of a girl named Katy who finds a wild mustang and trains her in the dark of night against her father's wishes. When her father finds out, he is furious and sells the horse to a local rodeo. The story that follows is one of connectivity and identity; one...

Giant Oil Portraits Memorialize Female Reporters Killed in Action

While newspapers at home struggle to stay relevant and profitable, reporters abroad struggle to stay alive. Dedicated to exposing the truth, protecting their sources, and improving the quality of life for those living in war-torn nations, the men and women (especially women) reporting intenationally frequently find themselves targeted. Since the Committee to Protect Journalists started...

How Do We Solve Publishing's Gender Gap?

"Who says women don't write serious nonfiction?" ask the editors at Creative Nonfiction, the largest literary magazine dedicated to publishing exclusively high quality nonfiction prose. The meaty essay section in their winter issue, titled "Female Form," happens to feature (surprise!) solely women writers. In a fortuitous coincidence, the release of "Female Form" dovetails...

Three Things I Learned at the Exceptional Women in Publishing Conference

Yesterday, I was down in San Francisco talking about Bitch at the Exceptional Women in Publishing's Fifth Annual Women's Leadership Conference. That's right, exceptional! We were thrilled to learn so much from other like-minded women with passion for media and be a part of the panel discussing  Best Practices in Social Media with Twitter Editorial Director Karen Wickre, VegNews...

The Likability Trap: We Like to Root for the Antihero, But Not the Antiheroine

On TV, there's a new guard of heroines calling the shots. From chipper Leslie Knope on Parks and Recreation to fractured Carrie Mathison on Homeland to narcissistic Amy Jellicoe on Enlightened, we see women anchoring our favorite shows. So what makes these characters so often cringe-worthy?In The New Yorker, TV critic Emily Nussbaum took note of this...

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