Latest Articles

<em>L'illusionniste</em> Fails to Work its Magic

Best Animated Feature Film nominee L'illusionniste (The Illusionist) came out on DVD in the USA last week. I looked forward to seeing it, given that I enjoyed Sylvain Chomet's Belleville Rendezvous (The Triplets of Belleville)—who can forget that loaded, graceful scene where the men turn into monkeys?—and plenty of critics gave L'illusionniste their stamps of...

Bitch Wins an Utne Independent Press Award!

Bitch Media proudly took home the Utne Independent Press Award for Social/Cultural Coverage at last night's awards ceremony at the MPA-Association of Magazine Media's Independent Magazine Media Conference in San Francisco. 2011 marks Bitch's tenth Utne nomination since 1999 and first-ever win, making this honor all the more exciting. Thanks Utne!

(On the left: Andi, Bitch's...

Electro Feminisms: M.I.A and Diplo, Taking Credit

One of the things that's really persistent in electronic music is the idea of female artists as proteges, molded, shaped by a man behind the scenes. As Joanna Russ detailed in How to Suppress Women's Writing, women's contributions to culture are actively suppressed. A man must have written that book, or those lyrics, or song. That "makes sense," to a culture that values men's...

Sm{art}: The Disarming Catherine Eyde

I fall more in love with the work of Catherine Eyde every time I look at her art. Her colorful renditions of women, creatures and landscapes both ordinary and fantastical walk the line between twee and haunting, like a gorgeous, uneasy mixture of Grimm's fairy tales, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and feminist sci-fi.

New Articles from the Reverb Issue of Bitch!

The next issue of Bitch magazine—the Reverb issue—is on its way to mailboxes and newsstands! We've uploaded several articles for you to read online, including a look at women in the contemporary Atheist movement ("The Unbelievers: New Atheism and the Old Boys' Club" by Victoria Bekiempis), an interview with the woman behind the sci-fi short everyone is talking about ("...

"The Africa That I Know": A Q&A with "Pumzi" Director Wanuri Kahiu

The setting is 35 years after World War III: The Water War. A society felled by ecological destruction has been relegated to a subterranean existence, and citizens' movements are strictly regulated by an authoritarian government propagating a single message: "The outside is dead." Then a young scientist named Asha discovers a sprouting seed, sparking a journey that will force her to defy her...

Party Out of Bounds: Booze, the Pleasure Principle, and Party-Girl Pop

America, it would seem, is on a bender. From the shot-fueled mayhem of Jersey Shore (the most popular show in MTV's history) to a special booze-themed episode of Glee, to the blog Texts From Last Night immortalizing those crucial missives sent while sloshed, there seems to be no way to slake our collective thirst for entertainment exploring the fun of drinking—though...

Pork Underbelly: The Sexual Politics of (Lots and Lots of) Meat

If you know your way around an Internet meme, you've probably heard of the online cooking show Epic Meal Time, a Food Network–meets–Jackass celebration of heart-clogging lowbrow cuisine. Each Tuesday, its rowdy Canadian creators cook up something both imaginative (Chili Four Loko, for instance), gross (meat salad), or, more likely, both (the Thanksgiving episode found them taking...

The Unbelievers: New Atheism and the Old Boys' Club

Women are God-fearing and don't challenge institutions. Men, on the other hand, are skeptical and rational, and go out of their way to publicly call bullshit on faith and religion—which is why today's well-known secular thinkers, especially in the ranks of the New Atheism movement, are all male.

These statements should sound ridiculous because, of course, they are. From Madalyn Murray O...

Revenge of the Feminerd: In Praise of Batgirl

Since those early days of running around doing Batman-themed dressup, Batgirl has been my favorite superheroine.

She's less cutesy than the Sailor Scouts, nerdier than Nightshade, wears more clothing than Wonder Woman, and has a greater variety of super abilities than my second-favorite superheroine, Storm (but it's really close, so don't hate on me, X-Men fans).

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