Latest Articles

Political InQueery: She's Got to Be Something, Right?

Regardless of which person the President would have selected for Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court, I would have been interested. I am curious to see what floats around in the ether (read: debate) around present-day nominees, and given the interest by many in the makeup of the court, I want to keep tabs on the rhetoric around this specific nominee. Especially since she's an...

Snarky's Cinemachine: Helen Mirren is looking for some action!

Helen Mirren keeps popping up in my daily conversations and I am doing my best to resist this wave of Helen Fever. I had a strain of Helen Fever in 1995 (while sick with an actual fever and accompanied by marathons of Prime Suspect) so I felt this time around I was somewhat immune.

At least I thought I was.

Sm{art}: Not your grandmother's quilts

 

Linda Gass is definitely not be the first to use her skills in sewing for political activism, even within the environmental art movement.

Susan Shie is credited with starting the Green Quilt Movement in 1989, with two other artists, taking quilts off of the bed and on to the walls to promote ecology and our stewardship of the earth. Gass is one of over 1,000 artists...

B-Sides: Ladies Rock Camp

Boys aren't the only ones who play air guitar. Granted, I didn't pretend I was David Lee Roth, but I'm sure I shamefully mimicked those epic "Free Bird" riffs. If you're like me and still haven't grown out of the pantomime instrument routine, you're in luck.

TelevIsm: The Erasure of Heylia and Conrad on Weeds

Weeds in its first three seasons was an excellent show—it was well-written, clever satire with multifaceted and funny characters. Its send-up of the rhetoric and culture of suburbia was funny and pointed and coherent. Celia was a hilarious and capable antagonist, and I loved that the older het white men on the show—Doug, Andy, and Dean—were strongly characterized as inept and lazy. In contrast...

Mad World: When advertisers stop being polite and start getting real

We had a conversation in the comments section on another Mad World post a while back regarding ads that use real people instead of actors to sell their products. Do these people get paid? Are they actually just actors in disguise? Why are we strangely compelled by their "real" presence in commercials? Well, dear Mad World readers, to get to the bottom of these issues, I recently went...

Adventures in Feministory: Women Cigarette Smokers

The ubiquity of commercial cigarettes in the United States is a 20th century phenomenon. In large part, the massive popularity of cigarettes in the United States can be traced back to their rationing to soldiers during World War I and World War II. The cigarette's rise in popularity amongst women, however, is a different story all together. In this special edition of Adventures in Feministory,...

Political InQueery: Fictional Political Tropes

I love movies, and I am more than interested in politics. So it behooves me to think about the sizable overlap between the two. One of the things I love about political movies (and heck, political television shows, too) are the tropes they include and play to, especially as tropes reveal something about an era's ideology around politics. There's something different in the feel and mood, for...

Snarky's Cinemachine: The Manchurian Feminist

Whenever I am asked to name a film whose female actor's performance lifted me out of the recliner I immediately think of Angela Lansbury's chilling turn as Eleanor Iselin in the 1962 John Frankenheimer film The Manchurian Candidate. (Don't bother with the soggy 2004 remake, which is awful in every way imaginable) The Manchurian Candidate is a palate cleansing suspense...

On Our Radar

It's that time again! We're rounding up some of the most interesting things we read this week in the another edition of On Our Radar.

  • With the release of Forbes' list of the top 100 Websites For Women, Renee Martin of Womanist Musings writes on the incredible lack of blogs by women of color, trans women, and disabled women.
  • Shelby Knox reflects on body image and feminism...

Pages